March 2010 Archives

A Web Of Air

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Waterstone's Buying Teams

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Waterstone's has reorganised and restructured its buying teams in order to give more specific attention to backlist and non-campaign titles.

The children's buying team consists of:

Kate Skipper, Campaign Buyer for children's

Justin Hutchinson, Assistant Campaign Buyer for children's

Claudia Mody, Range Buyer for children's

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Young Romantics

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A newly discovered memoir from a woman close to Byron and Shelley brands them as worshippers of free love and 'monsters'

I shall look forward to reading the full-length book

Young Romantics, about the Shelleys, Byron and "other tangled lives", to be published by Bloomsbury on 13 May.

Lamentable Times

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For much of my life The Times has been my newspaper of choice. I would buy and read other papers alongside, but it was always The Times first, The Guardian next and any other paper if there appeared to be something noteworthy in it, or if I wanted to track coverage of a particular news subject such as (and this is going back a bit) the controversy surrounding Melvin Burgess's JUNK.
When I was growing up, the newspapers that came into the house were the Telegraph (whisked away by my dad for his daily commute), the Daily Mail and (on my father's return from work) the Evening Standard. When, in my early teens, I briefly harboured notions of becoming a theatre critic (hard to explain this ambition given that I have been to the regular West End theatre less than a dozen times in my life) I persuaded my parents to add the Sunday Times and Observer to their weekly newsagent order.
I first began reading the The Times weekday edition after meeting my wife. Her father completed the crossword every day and by evening had set the paper aside and I would pounce on it. While away at university, every visit to the union building would begin with a check of the ground-floor pigeonholes and then it would be up the stairs and turn left into the newspaper room and look around to see if any broadsheets were available.
In the first years of living independently, buying a broadsheet on a regular basis would have been an unaffordable indulgence. The much cheaper Daily Mirror had a good racing section (these were times when an evening bottle of wine had to be won with a lucky bet on a horse) and often contained lively and contentious reporting (late 1970s).
That still leaves the best part of three decades that I can count myself as being a daily reader of The Times.
My allegiances have been leaning towards The Guardian for a long time and now it is firmly my newspaper of choice.
The Times is a mess. It is both 'in a mess' and, quite literally 'a mess'.
I have been lamenting for months, as regular readers of this blog will know, the hopelessness of its website indexing. And now it is foolish enough to announce that from mid-summer it will be charging £1 a day to access the online edition of the paper. Who in their right mind would bother? The site, just like the actual newsprint newspaper, is a mess, unwieldy to navigate and often poorly updated (especially the cultural sections). Closing public access to archived material on the site will mean that thousands and thousands of websearch links will prove dead ends or meet with £1 please doorman requests.
But this isn't why, for the first time in decades, I stopped picking up The Times in the newsagent on several days this week and walked out with only The Guardian in my hand.
The Times has been messing with its format for ages. There used to be an easily extractable Times 2 section which is now embedded in the main paper, making it an unwieldy mishmash. There is, quite simply, no pleasure to be had in reading it any more. It's like having an overbulky Daily Mail in your hands. As for the Saturday edition, whoever thought up the bizarre contradiction in formats between the fat tabloid sized main paper and the HUGE broadsheet-of-old sized Review section. Yes, the Saturday edition is a mess as well.
The Guardian on the other hand is a perfect union of form and content each day of the week.
Furthermore, there are these annoying efforts to persuade readers to become 'subscribers'. I am sorry but even when I read The Times every day I never considered myself a 'subscriber', and I do not want any more mailings telling me about the perks available to subscribers. I have already tested the 'service', and I do not want to have to remember to take my voucher with me every time I go to a newsagent. And frankly, the subscriber saving being offered (after the initial introductory offer) is derisory and certainly not worth the hassle of vouchers that haven't been properly perforated and do not tear off neatly. The more I think about it the more convinced I am that it was that pesky booklet of vouchers which finally made me lose patience with The Times. Given all the investment of time and resources that must have gone towards setting up and promoting this ill-conceived subscriber 'Club' scheme, and all the planning and preparing that I gather has been involved in establishing the pay-per-view access to the website, it is hard to see how The Times can rediscover its way.


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Philip Pullman's new retelling of the Jesus story

extract, as published in today's Guardian Review

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Guardian Review

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Guardian Review

The Death Defying Pepper Roux by Geraldine McCaughrean

The publisher's blurb compares Pepper Roux to the movie Amélie, largely because they're both set in France. This is like comparing the siege of Stalingrad to the Eurovision song contest because they both involve Russians and Germans. Pepper Roux is much funnier, much more stylish and much more profound. If you want to compare it to something else you could try Borges or García Márquez. FRANK COTTRELL BOYCE

FBC says something else very perceptive about McCaughrean: "McCaughrean has had a brilliant career. She has won the Whitbread three times, and the Carnegie. She was chosen to write the official sequel to Peter Pan. If she doesn't have the high profile you'd expect, that may be because she doesn't repeat herself, and so has not become a brand. Like Pepper she takes on a different identity for each book."

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Bisto Shortlist

An Greasaí Bróg agus na Síoga- Caitríona Hastings and Andrew Whitson
Chalkline - Jane Mitchell
Colm and The Lazarus Key - Kieran Mark Crowley
Gluaiseacht - Alan Titley
Lincoln and His Boys - Pj Lynch
Solace of the Road- Siobhan Dowd
The Eyeball Collector- FE Higgins
The Gates- John Connolly
The Third Pig Detective Agency- Bob Burke
There - Marie Louise Fitzpatrick

The Hans Christian Andersen Award Jury of the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY), has announced that David Almond, from the United Kingdom is the winner of the 2010 Hans Christian Andersen Author Award and that Jutta Bauer, from Germany is the winner of the 2010 Hans Christian Andersen Illustrator Award. The announcement was made at the Bologna International Children's Book Fair, and the Andersen medals and diplomas will be presented to the winners on Saturday, 11 September 2010 at the international IBBY congress in Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

The Hans Christian Andersen Award is the highest international recognition given to an author and an illustrator of children's books. In awarding the 2010 Hans Christian Andersen Medal for writing to David Almond, the jury has recognized the unique voice of a creator of magic realism for children. Almond captures his young readers' imagination and motivates them to read, think and be critical. His use of language is sophisticated and reaches across the ages.

The 2010 Hans Christian Andersen Medal for illustration recognizes Jutta Bauer as a powerful narrator who blends real life with legend through her pictures. The jury admired her philosophical approach, originality, creativity as well as her ability to communicate with young readers.

David Almond was selected from 28 authors for the award. The four finalists were: Ahmad Reza Ahmadi from Iran, Bartolomeu Campos de Queiros from Brazil, Lennart Hellsing from Sweden and Louis Jensen from Denmark.

Jutta Bauer was selected from 27 illustrators nominated. The four finalists were Carll Cneut from Belgium, Etienne Delessert from Switzerland, Svjetlan Junakovic from Croatia and Roger Mello from Brazil. The full list of candidates can be read at www.ibby.org.

The ten members of the 2010 Jury, led by Jury President Zohreh Ghaeni from Iran, met in Basel, Switzerland on 13 and 14 March 2010. The Jury of children's literature experts comprised Ernest Bond (USA), Karen Coeman (Mexico), Nadia El Kholy (Egypt), Maria Jesus Gil (Spain), Jan Hansson (Sweden), Annemie Leysen (Belgium), Darja Mazi-Leskovar (Slovenia), Alicia Salvi (Argentina), Helene Schar (Switzerland) and Regina Zilberman (Brazil). Elda Nogueira from Brazil representing IBBY and Liz Page as Jury Secretary attended the meeting ex officio.

The Hans Christian Andersen Award is considered the most prestigious in international children's literature, is given biennially by IBBY to a living author and illustrator whose complete works are judged to have made lasting contributions to children's literature. Her Majesty Queen Margrethe II of Denmark is the Patron of the Andersen Awards. The Author's Award has been given since 1956 and the Illustrator's Award since 1966. Nami Island Inc. is the sponsor of the Hans Christian Andersen Awards. Information, including a history of the awards is available at www.ibby.org.


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The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) today announced the winners of the 2010 IBBY-Asahi Reading Promotion Awards. This is the 20th Anniversary of the award given by IBBY and the Asahi Shimbun newspaper company for international projects run by groups or institutions judged to be making a lasting contribution to reading for young people. The Award is given every other year to two organizations. The 2010 winners are
The Osu Children's Library Fund, Ghana, http://www.osuchildrenslibraryfund.ca,
and Convenio de Cooperación al Plan de Lectura, Medellín, Colombia, http://bit.ly/9kSlvg.

Each will receive $10,000 US, which will be presented at the 32nd IBBY Congress in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, at a special event on September 10th.

The Osu Children's Library Fund (OCLF) consists of two teams one in Canada and the other in Africa- that share the mission of bringing books and literacy skills to African children and adults. OCLF works at the grassroots level, seeking support and participation of elders and members of the host community.

Convenio de Cooperación al Plan de Lectura is a non-profit organization that encourages reading and literary creation by means of awareness, training and research programs, including workshops, storytelling and sessions with authors and illustrators.


Other nominees were:
Alola Literacy & Reading Programme, Dili, Timor-Leste
Indigenous Children´s Literature Writers´ Meeting, Brazil
Visible Readings for Invisible Children, Medellín, Colombia
Room to Read, USA
Kamishibai - To build a culture of peace in the world, Japan
Justita Arenas Reading Room, México City, México
Mama, Tata & ... Myself Campaign, Nowa Iwiczna, Poland
Roma People, invited to the library, Metlika, Slovenia
White Elephant / Domrei Sor, Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Akili Trust, Kenya


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Anna Frank Award

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Anna Frank Award [please note this is not the same as the Anne Frank Award]

Feniks publishing house and the Makedonija Prezent Foundation of Skopje, Republic of
Macedonia, will be presenting the International Anna Frank Award to Canadian writer K.V. Johansen at
the 22nd International Book Fair in Skopje, which will be held from 13 to 18 April 2010. The award jury -
Hristo Petreski (president), Aleksandar Prokopiev, Velko Nedelkovski, Tode Ilievski and Svetlana
Ivanovska - selected the author of the book Torrie and the Snake-Prince, which was published in the
Macedonian language as Тори и принцот-змија by Vermilion Books, translated from English by Marija
Todorova.

K.V. Johansen is also to be a guest of the Skopje Book Fair, where she will attend the launch of
the Macedonian translation of her children's novel, Torrie and the Snake-Prince. Johansen, a scholar who
has, in addition to her many novels for children and young adults, written two books on the history of
children's literature, will also be taking part in a panel discussion on children's literature in Canada and
Macedonia with Macedonian academic Vlada Ursevic as part of a Day of Canadian Culture organized in
co-operation with the Canadian Embassy in Belgrade.

On her way to Macedonia, Johansen will be in Vienna, Austria, on April 9 and 10 for the launch
of her latest book, The Shadow Road, at an event organized by the Canadian Embassy in Vienna. The first
book in this series for teens, Nightwalker, was included in VOYA's Year's Best List 2007, was an Ontario
Library Association Top Ten Best Bets book for 2007, and winner of the 2008 Ann Connor Brimer
Award.

For more information on the tour or Johansen's works, please visit her website at: www.pippin.ca

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Guardian Review

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Guardian review

Josh lacey reviews HALO by Zizou Corder

The novel has flaws: the plot is episodic and too reliant on a string of unlikely coincidences; characters are introduced, then forgotten and discarded; the ending is rushed. But these irritations are swept aside by the  energy of the writing and some great set pieces, the best being a wonderfully vivid description of the oracle at Delphi.

The book is crammed with a multitude of real and invented characters, and oozes geeky information about the ancient Greeks. (Some notes at the back even explain how to make a bow or bake baklava.)

It will undoubtedly inspire young readers to learn more about the period... JOSH LACEY

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2010 Hans Christian Andersen Awards Shortlist

The five short-listed authors in alphabetical order are:
· Ahmad Reza Ahmadi from Iran
· David Almond from the United Kingdom
· Bartolomeu Campos de Queiros from Brazil
· Lennart Hellsing from Sweden
· Louis Jensen from Denmark

The five short-listed illustrators in alphabetical order are:
· Jutta Bauer from Germany
· Carll Cneut from Belgium
· Etienne Delessert from Switzerland
· Svjetlan Junakovic from Croatia
· Roger Mello from Brazil

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MY SISTER LIVES ON THE MANTELPIECE

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Orion Children's Books have announced the acquisition of MY SISTER LIVES ON THE MANTELPIECE, a debut novel by Annabel Pitcher.

The deal was negotiated with Catherine Clarke of the Felicity Bryan Agency.

Narrated by ten year old Jamie, MY SISTER LIVES ON THE MANTELPIECE is about life after tragedy and documents the falling apart of a family and the ways they find to rebuild their lives.

MY SISTER LIVES ON THE MANTELPIECE will be published in hardback in spring 2011.

Times Review

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Times Review

Amanda Craig reviewed Garrett Carr's The Badness of Ballydog ("one of the funniest debuts for 8-12s for some time") and Daughter of Fire and Ice by Marie-Louise Jensen ("shows her talent for suspenseful historical fiction") in Saturday's TIMES...


Orion Children's Books have announced the acquisition of a new series from the bestselling author of THE ROMAN MYSTERIES, Caroline Lawrence.

In a major deal, negotiated with Clare Pearson of Eddison Pearson Ltd, publisher Fiona Kennedy acquired World English Language (excluding US and Canada) and translation rights for THE WESTERN MYSTERIES: THE CASE OF THE COUNTERFEIT INJUNS and three further 'cases' in the series. US rights will be sold on behalf of Clare Pearson by Brenda Bowen at Sanford J. Greenburger Associates in New York.

Set in Virginia City, Nevada Territory during the 1860s silver boom, the books will follow the varying fortunes of twelve year-old P.K. Pinkerton in a quest for the truth, a family, and the ultimate goal: a position as a 'Private Eye' at the Pinkerton Detective Agency in Chicago.

The first case will be published in hardback in early summer 2011.


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Nosy Crow

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Nosy Crow

Must have had my eye off the ball. Kate Wilson's new venture has been up and running for a month, and I've only just found out.
The website, I have to say, is wonderfully cool.
ACHUKA has high expectations!

Guardian Review

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Guardian Review

We by John Dickinson reviewed by Philip Ardagh

Though there are some truly gripping moments of extreme danger, this is a novel of ideas more than action, but it is to Dickinson's credit that intellectual argument and internal conflict have been used to create such a strong driving force. PHILIP ARDAGH
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Hilary Duff Signs Young Adult Book Deal

with Simon & Schuster...

She is set to bring out a series of young adult novels. Beginning with "Elixir", set to hit bookstores in October, the series will follow the adventures of a globe-trotting photojournalist named Clea Raymond.


Publication of the CILIP Carnegie long listed REVOLVER in paperback in April 2010 will be the first in a new cover look for author Marcus Sedgwick, followed by the hardback publication of his new teen novel, WHITE CROW, in July.
The new look will then be used across Sedgwick's entire backlist throughout the summer with all ten novels relaunched in paperback by October 2010.
Publisher Fiona Kennedy says of the relaunch: "2010 is Marcus' first year as a full time writer. It's going to be a significant year for him in many ways, and seemed the ideal time to give his backlist this stunning new look. All ten of his novels remain consistently in print from his Branford Boase winning debut FLOODLAND in 2000 to his latest titles, and we are confident that the relaunch will take him to an even larger audience."

Ireland To get Its Own Children's Laureate

Nominations must be received by 5pm March 19th 2010. No nomination can be accepted after this deadline. The recipient of the first Children's Laureate will be announced on May 13th 2010. 

There will be a special information forum on Ireland's First Children's Laureate at 10.30am on Monday March 8th in Council Chambers, City Hall, Dame Street, Dublin 2 as part of Dublin Book Festival.

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Anthony Horowitz Interview - The Times

Recommended

...Horowitz was, he says, "personally really disappointed" that Anthony Browne, the current children's laureate, "chose to go on television supporting the government legislation" against the views of Fine, Pullman, Morpurgo and himself. "It was almost a nail in the coffin of the laureateship, as far as I was concerned." Browne asked Horowitz: "How can you argue against this legislation if it will save the life of one child?" But Horowitz responds: "That to me is a totally false argument, because it won't save the life of one child, first of all, and if you take the argument to its logical conclusion you will end up with children locked in rooms being fed vitamins. That way you will know 100% they are not going to get into any trouble."


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Cumulative Website Listing

Here is the cumulative featured website listing that was missing from the most recent Deakin Newsletter... worth bookmarking...

It's World Book Day!

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World Book Day (UK and Ireland) 2008 logo

Image via Wikipedia

World Book Day is the biggest annual celebration of books and reading in the UK and Ireland.

Watch this YouTube video....

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Blue Peter

Image via Wikipedia

Blue Peter Book Award Winner

A tale of two cryogenically frozen children from the 1950s, brought back to life in 2009, has won the Blue Peter book of the year award.
Frozen in Time was written by Ali Sparkes, who previously worked on BBC Radio 4's Home Truths.


Webchat with Ali Sparkes, author of the Blue Peter Book of the Year...

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AuthorHotline

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AuthorHotline

Launching on World Book Day, March 4th, AuthorHotline will host a competition for Infant and Junior School Children to runs throughout March.

The site is "proudly supported by all six Children's Laureates".

Shanville Monthly 116

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Deakin Newsletter Spring

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Deakin Newsletter - Spring 2010

Great as usual, though I miss the normal cumulative list of bookmarked websites..

About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries from March 2010 listed from newest to oldest.

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